Come September, France will collaborate with its Internet service to “black list” those Web sites it deems contain child pornographic, terror-related and otherwise racist content. Interior Minister Michel Alliot-Marie made

the announcement Tuesday while explaining France will compile the list based on input Internet users coming across the “offensive material” would give the state.

The United States came to a similar agreement with TimeWarner, Sprint and Verizon on Tuesday, if only with the focus of extricating child pornography sites from the Web. The decision is part of France’s larger plan to eliminate cybercriminality.

"We can no longer tolerate the sexual exploitation of children in the form of cyber-pedopornography," Alliot-Marie told MSNBC. "We have come to an agreement: the access to child pornography sites will be blocked in France. Other democracies have done it. France could wait no longer."

Canada, Sweden, Denmark, Norway, New Zealand and the countries within Britain are among those that have begun to execute parallel measures.

Alliot-Marie elaborated that once the state would receive complaints about certain sites from Web users, it would decide whether they should go on the “black list” or not. Those exhibiting clearly criminal content would be referred to the judicial authorities.

Since sites blocked in one country tend to pop up in others, she said France would pass all pertinent information on through either Inter- or Europol.

In July, France will become the President of the Council of the European Union for six months. The position should help it better coordinate its efforts with other members of the Union.

Though she did not further explain how online privacy would be upheld, Alliot-Marie insisted

“[This will not] create a Big Brother of the Internet” and that she is in full favor of maintaining the "fundamental liberty that is Internet access” as long as it is a safe platform.